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Indications

Prolia® is indicated for the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, or multiple risk factors for fracture; or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy. In postmenopausal Read More

Prolia® is indicated for the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, or multiple risk factors for fracture; or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy. In postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, Prolia® reduces the incidence of vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fractures.

Prolia® is indicated for treatment to increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, or multiple risk factors for fracture; or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy.

Prolia® is indicated as a treatment to increase bone mass in men at high risk for fracture receiving androgen deprivation therapy for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. In these patients Prolia® also reduced the incidence of vertebral fractures.

Prolia® is indicated as a treatment to increase bone mass in women at high risk for fracture receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy for breast cancer. Close

For treatment to increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture

Consider Prolia® to help protect your male osteoporosis patients with multiple risk factors for fracture.

Risk factors include1

  • Loss of height
  • Advanced age
  • Low bone mineral density (BMD)
  • Family history of osteoporosis or fractures
  • Prior fracture
  • Low testosterone or estrogen levels

The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends vertebral imaging tests for men who2:

  • Are age 50 or older with certain risk factors such as:
    • Low trauma fracture during adulthood
    • Historical height loss of 1.5 inches or more (defined as the difference between the current height and peak height at age 20)
    • Prospective height loss of ≥ 0.8 inches (defined as the difference between the current height and a previously documented height measurement)
  • Are age 70 to 79 with BMD T-score ≤ -1.5
  • Are age 80 or older with BMD T-score < -1.0
?

Does his height match his driver’s license?

Height loss of more than one inch may indicate that a male patient is at risk for developing osteoporosis and may be at risk for fracture. However, this may be one of many things to consider when thinking about osteoporosis in men age 50 and older.1

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