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Indications

Prolia® is indicated for the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, or multiple risk factors for fracture; or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy. In postmenopausal Read More

Prolia® is indicated for the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, or multiple risk factors for fracture; or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy. In postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, Prolia® reduces the incidence of vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fractures.

Prolia® is indicated for treatment to increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, or multiple risk factors for fracture; or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy.

Prolia® is indicated as a treatment to increase bone mass in men at high risk for fracture receiving androgen deprivation therapy for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. In these patients Prolia® also reduced the incidence of vertebral fractures.

Prolia® is indicated as a treatment to increase bone mass in women at high risk for fracture receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy for breast cancer. Close

Prolia® may be appropriate for more than one type of patient with postmenopausal osteoporosis at high risk for fracture in your practice.

Guidelines from AACE* include Prolia® as a first-line therapy option for the treatment of most postmenopausal osteoporosis patients at high risk for fracture1:

In postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, or multiple risk factors for fracture, or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy.

*AACE: American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.

Consider Prolia® to help protect your PMO patients with multiple risk factors for fracture

Advanced age

Advanced age

Among women, 65 years or older is considered advanced age.2

Low BMD

Low BMD

Bone mass density of -2.5 or less is considered low.1

Falling

Falling

A fracture that results from a fall from standing height almost always indicates decreased skeletal strength.1

Excessive thinness

Excessive thinness

A body mass index of 18.5 or less is considered underweight.3

Cigarette smoking

Cigarette smoking

Multiple studies have shown that cigarette smoking increases osteoporotic fracture risk.1

Low calcium intake

Low calcium intake

When intake is inadequate, bone tissue is resorbed from the skeleton to maintain serum calcium levels.1

Immobility/Inactivity

Immobility/Inactivity

Regular weight-bearing exercise to improve agility, strength, posture, and balance may reduce risk of falling.1

Vitamin D deficiency

Vitamin D deficiency

A 25(OH)D blood level of < 30 ng/ml (75 nmol/L) is considered deficient.2

Prior fracture as an adult

Prior fracture as an adult

Consider fractures that occur after age 50 due to overloaded, weakened bone (but not major trauma).2

Parental history of hip fracture

Parental history of hip fracture

Assess family history of osteoporosis.2

2 or more of these risk factors may put your PMO patients at high risk for fracture.2,4
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Consider Prolia® to help protect your PMO patients who are intolerant to other osteoporosis therapies.4

Prolia® is administered as a subcutaneous injection every 6 months in the upper arm, upper thigh, or abdomen4

  • Pre-existing hypocalcemia must be corrected prior to initiating therapy with Prolia®
  • Adequately supplement all patients with calcium and vitamin D
  • Multiple vertebral fractures have been reported following Prolia® discontinuation
  • Prolia® does not undergo first-pass metabolism5 and may lessen pill burden
  • This image is for illustration purposes only.
Transition Study
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According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, people taking an osteoporosis medicine should repeat their bone density test by DXA every 1-2 years as part of a treatment plan.6

Prolia® is proven to
significantly reduce
fracture risk
at vertebral,
hip, and nonvertebral
sites4,9†
Pivotal phase 3 fracture trial vs placebo (N=7808).4,9

Consider Prolia® to help protect your PMO patients who have had prior osteoporotic fractures.

Prior vertebral fractures in women increase the risk of subsequent vertebral fractures (when compared to women without prior vertebral fractures).8

  • This image is for illustration purposes only.
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The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) recommends BMD testing for postmenopausal women who have had an adult age fracture, to diagnose and determine degree of osteoporosis.2 NOF also recommends that people taking an osteoporosis medicine should repeat their bone density test by DXA every 1-2 years as part of a treatment plan.6