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1 in 2 Women Over the Age of 50 Will Have a Fracture Related to Osteoporosis in Their Lifetime1

Osteoporotic fracture in postmenopausal women is a significant public health issue.1

Estimated Yearly Incidence of Osteoporotic Fractures and Other Serious Conditions2-5

Only 24% of women who suffered an osteoporotic fracture received treatment during the following year.6**

In women, a prior osteoporotic fracture increases the relative risk of a subsequent hip fracture by 77%.7††

** Fracture sites: hip, vertebrae, or wrist. Data are drawn from a retrospective database study from 7 health maintenance organizations.
†† Compared to women without a prior fracture.

The Risk of Fracture Increases Substantially with Advanced Age8

Incidence of Fracture with Age8

Adapted from Harvey N, et al. In: Rosen CJ, ed. Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism. 7th ed. Washington, DC: American Society for Bone and Mineral Research; 2008:198-203.

In a separate study estimating the 10-year probability of osteoporotic fracture, the risk of hip fracture was tripled in women aged 75 compared with women at 65 years of age.9

Prolia® (denosumab) may be an appropriate treatment option for patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, including those with:10

  • A history of osteoporotic fracture
  • Multiple risk factors for fracture, where advanced age may be one of the risk factors
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References

1. US Department of Health and Human Services. Bone Health and Osteoporosis: A Report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Surgeon General; 2004. 2. Burge R, Dawson-Hughes B, Solomon DH, et al. Incidence and economic burden of osteoporosis-related fractures in the United States, 2005-2025. J Bone Miner Res. 2007;22:465-475. 3. Roger VL, Go AS, Lloyd-Jones DM, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics 2012 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2012;125:e2-220. 4. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2012. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2012. 5. Watts NB, Bilezikian JP, Camacho PM, et al. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the diagnosis and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Endocr Pract. 2010;16 (suppl 3):1-37. 6. Andrade SE, Majumdar SR, Chan KA, et al. Low frequency of treatment of osteoporosis among postmenopausal women following a fracture. Arch Intern Med. 2003;163:2052-2057. 7. Kanis JA, Johnell O, De Laet C, et al. A meta-analysis of previous fracture and subsequent fracture risk. Bone. 2004; 35:375 382. 8. Harvey N, Dennison E, Cooper C. Epidemiology of osteoporotic fractures. In: Rosen CJ, ed. Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism. 7th ed. Washington, DC: American Society for Bone and Mineral Research; 2008:198-203. 9. Kanis JA, Johnell O, Oden A, Dawson A, De Laet C, Jonsson B. Ten year probabilities of osteoporotic fractures according to BMD and diagnostic thresholds. Osteoporos Int. 2001;12:989-995. 10. Prolia® (denosumab) prescribing information, Amgen.
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1 in 2 Women Over the Age of 50 Will Have a Fracture Related to Osteoporosis in Their Lifetime1

Osteoporotic fracture in postmenopausal women is a significant public health issue.1

Estimated Yearly Incidence of Osteoporotic Fractures and Other Serious Conditions2-5

Only 24% of women who suffered an osteoporotic fracture received treatment during the following year.6**

In women, a prior osteoporotic fracture increases the relative risk of a subsequent hip fracture by 77%.7††

** Fracture sites: hip, vertebrae, or wrist. Data are drawn from a retrospective database study from 7 health maintenance organizations.
†† Compared to women without a prior fracture.

The Risk of Fracture Increases Substantially with Advanced Age8

Incidence of Fracture with Age8

Adapted from Harvey N, et al. In: Rosen CJ, ed. Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism. 7th ed. Washington, DC: American Society for Bone and Mineral Research; 2008:198-203.

In a separate study estimating the 10-year probability of osteoporotic fracture, the risk of hip fracture was tripled in women aged 75 compared with women at 65 years of age.9

Prolia® (denosumab) may be an appropriate treatment option for patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, including those with:10

  • A history of osteoporotic fracture
  • Multiple risk factors for fracture, where advanced age may be one of the risk factors
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References

1. US Department of Health and Human Services. Bone Health and Osteoporosis: A Report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Surgeon General; 2004. 2. Burge R, Dawson-Hughes B, Solomon DH, et al. Incidence and economic burden of osteoporosis-related fractures in the United States, 2005-2025. J Bone Miner Res. 2007;22:465-475. 3. Roger VL, Go AS, Lloyd-Jones DM, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics 2012 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2012;125:e2-220. 4. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2012. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2012. 5. Watts NB, Bilezikian JP, Camacho PM, et al. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the diagnosis and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Endocr Pract. 2010;16 (suppl 3):1-37. 6. Andrade SE, Majumdar SR, Chan KA, et al. Low frequency of treatment of osteoporosis among postmenopausal women following a fracture. Arch Intern Med. 2003;163:2052-2057. 7. Kanis JA, Johnell O, De Laet C, et al. A meta-analysis of previous fracture and subsequent fracture risk. Bone. 2004; 35:375 382. 8. Harvey N, Dennison E, Cooper C. Epidemiology of osteoporotic fractures. In: Rosen CJ, ed. Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism. 7th ed. Washington, DC: American Society for Bone and Mineral Research; 2008:198-203. 9. Kanis JA, Johnell O, Oden A, Dawson A, De Laet C, Jonsson B. Ten year probabilities of osteoporotic fractures according to BMD and diagnostic thresholds. Osteoporos Int. 2001;12:989-995. 10. Prolia® (denosumab) prescribing information, Amgen.
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